living reruns

Hello.

red-lipstick:

Cai Vail (USA) - Spark, 2014     Drawings: Ink, Watercolors, +Digital

red-lipstick:

Cai Vail (USA) - Spark, 2014     Drawings: Ink, Watercolors, +Digital

Remedy for a case of windless sails

Followers! This week has left me feeling really sideswiped, deflated, and tender, but I need to rally for an important and possibly-future-employment-gaining-but-totally-in-Spanish-and-outside-my-comfort-zone dinner tonight!

So tell me, all: What do you do to re-puff yourself after being seriously knocked for a loop? How do you restore yourself to your typical kick-ass status quo? I’m feeling bummed and disappointed all over the place and I need a confidence boost, stat.

supersonicart:

Gustavo Peña.

Paintings by Gustavo Peña:

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cjwho:

Vienna State Opera by Christoph Sevcnikar
The building was the first major building on the Vienna Ringstraße commissioned by the Viennese “city expansion fund”. Work commenced on the building in 1861 and was completed in 1869, following plans drawn up by architects August Sicard von Sicardsburg and Eduard van der Nüll. It was built in the Neo-Renaissance style.
The Ministry of the Interior had commissioned a number of reports into the availability of certain building materials, with the result that stones long not seen in Vienna were used, such as Wöllersdorfer Stein, for plinths and free-standing, simply-divided buttresses, the famously hard stone from Kaisersteinbruch, whose colour was more appropriate than that of Kelheimerstein, for more lushly decorated parts. The somewhat coarser-grained Kelheimerstein (also known as Solnhof Plattenstein) was intended as the main stone to be used in the building of the opera house, but the necessary quantity was not deliverable. Breitenbrunner stone was suggested as a substitute for the Kelheimer stone, and stone from Jois was used as a cheaper alternative to the Kaiserstein. The staircases were constructed from polished Kaiserstein, while most of the rest of the interior was decorated with varieties of marble.
The decision was made to use dimension stone for the exterior of the building. Due to the monumental demand for stone, stone from Sóskút, widely used in Budapest, was also used. Three Viennese masonry companies were employed to supply enough masonry labour: Eduard Hauser (still in existence today), Anton Wasserburger and Moritz Pranter. The foundation stone was laid on 20 May 1863.
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cjwho:

Vienna State Opera by Christoph Sevcnikar

The building was the first major building on the Vienna Ringstraße commissioned by the Viennese “city expansion fund”. Work commenced on the building in 1861 and was completed in 1869, following plans drawn up by architects August Sicard von Sicardsburg and Eduard van der Nüll. It was built in the Neo-Renaissance style.

The Ministry of the Interior had commissioned a number of reports into the availability of certain building materials, with the result that stones long not seen in Vienna were used, such as Wöllersdorfer Stein, for plinths and free-standing, simply-divided buttresses, the famously hard stone from Kaisersteinbruch, whose colour was more appropriate than that of Kelheimerstein, for more lushly decorated parts. The somewhat coarser-grained Kelheimerstein (also known as Solnhof Plattenstein) was intended as the main stone to be used in the building of the opera house, but the necessary quantity was not deliverable. Breitenbrunner stone was suggested as a substitute for the Kelheimer stone, and stone from Jois was used as a cheaper alternative to the Kaiserstein. The staircases were constructed from polished Kaiserstein, while most of the rest of the interior was decorated with varieties of marble.

The decision was made to use dimension stone for the exterior of the building. Due to the monumental demand for stone, stone from Sóskút, widely used in Budapest, was also used. Three Viennese masonry companies were employed to supply enough masonry labour: Eduard Hauser (still in existence today), Anton Wasserburger and Moritz Pranter. The foundation stone was laid on 20 May 1863.

CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe

scorpiondagger:

12 

No Rest for the Wicked— Lykke Li

…I love her.

Realistic Paintings Of Greenland Made By Zaria Forman | Posted by CJWHO.com Realistic Paintings Of Greenland Made By Zaria Forman | Posted by CJWHO.com Realistic Paintings Of Greenland Made By Zaria Forman | Posted by CJWHO.com Realistic Paintings Of Greenland Made By Zaria Forman | Posted by CJWHO.com Realistic Paintings Of Greenland Made By Zaria Forman | Posted by CJWHO.com Realistic Paintings Of Greenland Made By Zaria Forman | Posted by CJWHO.com Realistic Paintings Of Greenland Made By Zaria Forman | Posted by CJWHO.com

cjwho:

Realistic Paintings Of Greenland Made By Zaria Forman | via

Forget about Mona Lisa the 2D painting, Zaria Forman, a New York based artist, created these amazing 3D paintings by using waves of thick paint for the creation of water and icebergs. These paintings are based on Greenlands icebergs and mountains and she made them for her late mother.

In the first image you see Zaria working on creating the icebergs on a half finished canvas.

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typicalhope:

bye winter

typicalhope:

bye winter

The Power Of Poop: A Whale Story

Your “who knew?” fact of the day

benigoat:

Time-lapse of river changing course over 28 years.

benigoat:

Time-lapse of river changing course over 28 years.

(via rememo)

Fact of the Day:

Did you know that Brigitte Bardot has been fined five times for inciting racial hatred?

From Wikipedia:

In her 1999 book Le Carré de Pluton (“Pluto’s Square”), Bardot criticizes the procedure used in the ritual slaughter of sheep during the Muslim festival of Eid al-Adha. Additionally, in a section in the book entitled, “Open Letter to My Lost France”, Bardot writes that “my country, France, my homeland, my land is again invaded by an overpopulation of foreigners, especially Muslims”. For this comment, a French court fined her 30,000 francs in June 2000. She had been fined in 1997 for the original publication of this open letter in Le Figaro and again in 1998 for making similar remarks.[24][30][31] In her 2003 book, Un cri dans le silence (“A Scream in the Silence”), she warned of an “Islamicization of France”, and said of Muslim immigration:

Over the last twenty years, we have given in to a subterranean, dangerous, and uncontrolled infiltration, which not only resists adjusting to our laws and customs but which will, as the years pass, attempt to impose its own.[32]

In the book, she also contrasted her close gay friends with today’s homosexuals, who “jiggle their bottoms, put their little fingers in the air and with their little castrato voices moan about what those ghastly heteros put them through” and that some contemporary homosexuals behave like “fairground freaks”.[33]… [She was fined again in 2004 and 2008 for more anti-Muslim remarks]

Like what, I didn’t even realize she was still alive…

(via acidtooth)

Metal Musicians Show Their Soft Sides By Posing With Their Cats