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Realistic Paintings Of Greenland Made By Zaria Forman | Posted by CJWHO.com Realistic Paintings Of Greenland Made By Zaria Forman | Posted by CJWHO.com Realistic Paintings Of Greenland Made By Zaria Forman | Posted by CJWHO.com Realistic Paintings Of Greenland Made By Zaria Forman | Posted by CJWHO.com Realistic Paintings Of Greenland Made By Zaria Forman | Posted by CJWHO.com Realistic Paintings Of Greenland Made By Zaria Forman | Posted by CJWHO.com Realistic Paintings Of Greenland Made By Zaria Forman | Posted by CJWHO.com

cjwho:

Realistic Paintings Of Greenland Made By Zaria Forman | via

Forget about Mona Lisa the 2D painting, Zaria Forman, a New York based artist, created these amazing 3D paintings by using waves of thick paint for the creation of water and icebergs. These paintings are based on Greenlands icebergs and mountains and she made them for her late mother.

In the first image you see Zaria working on creating the icebergs on a half finished canvas.

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typicalhope:

bye winter

typicalhope:

bye winter

The Power Of Poop: A Whale Story

Your “who knew?” fact of the day

benigoat:

Time-lapse of river changing course over 28 years.

benigoat:

Time-lapse of river changing course over 28 years.

(via rememo)

Fact of the Day:

Did you know that Brigitte Bardot has been fined five times for inciting racial hatred?

From Wikipedia:

In her 1999 book Le Carré de Pluton (“Pluto’s Square”), Bardot criticizes the procedure used in the ritual slaughter of sheep during the Muslim festival of Eid al-Adha. Additionally, in a section in the book entitled, “Open Letter to My Lost France”, Bardot writes that “my country, France, my homeland, my land is again invaded by an overpopulation of foreigners, especially Muslims”. For this comment, a French court fined her 30,000 francs in June 2000. She had been fined in 1997 for the original publication of this open letter in Le Figaro and again in 1998 for making similar remarks.[24][30][31] In her 2003 book, Un cri dans le silence (“A Scream in the Silence”), she warned of an “Islamicization of France”, and said of Muslim immigration:

Over the last twenty years, we have given in to a subterranean, dangerous, and uncontrolled infiltration, which not only resists adjusting to our laws and customs but which will, as the years pass, attempt to impose its own.[32]

In the book, she also contrasted her close gay friends with today’s homosexuals, who “jiggle their bottoms, put their little fingers in the air and with their little castrato voices moan about what those ghastly heteros put them through” and that some contemporary homosexuals behave like “fairground freaks”.[33]… [She was fined again in 2004 and 2008 for more anti-Muslim remarks]

Like what, I didn’t even realize she was still alive…

(via acidtooth)

Metal Musicians Show Their Soft Sides By Posing With Their Cats

(via juiceonice)

When you recover or discover something that nourishes your soul and brings joy, care enough about yourself to make room for it in your life.

Jean Shinoda Bolen (via abstractnumbers)

(via abstractnumbers)

rfmmsd:

Artist:
José Luis López Galván
"Traje de Yo"
130 cm x 100 cm
Oleo / Tela
2013

rfmmsd:

Artist:

José Luis López Galván

"Traje de Yo"

130 cm x 100 cm

Oleo / Tela

2013

Life is going to present to you a series of transformations. And the point of education should be to transform you. To teach you how to be transformed so you can ride the waves as they come. But today, the point of education is not education. It’s accreditation. The more accreditation you have, the more money you make. That’s the instrumental logic of neoliberalism. And this instrumental logic comes wrapped in an envelope of fear. And my Ivy League, my MIT students are the same. All I feel coming off of my students is fear. That if you slip up in school, if you get one bad grade, if you make one fucking mistake, the great train of wealth will leave you behind. And that’s the logic of accreditation. If you’re at Yale, you’re in the smartest 1% in the world. […] And the brightest students in the world are learning in fear. I feel it rolling off of you in waves. But you can’t learn when you’re afraid. You cannot be transformed when you are afraid.

Junot Díaz, speaking at Yale  (via malinche)

Those final four sentences are something else.

(via genericlatino)

(via rememo)

(via rapscallions)

We’re well aware that we lose fertility at a certain age, but also that we lose professional power after we have kids. This is a generation of women who were raised on movies portraying the plight of the working mother, came of age in one of the worst economies in recent history, have read dozens of trend stories about the expense and trauma of IVF, yet still hope to have “it all.” They know the tough decisions that await them in their thirties. And so, they figure, better put in the professional work now — get as far as you can before it’s time to procreate. I wasn’t surprised to read a report from the Pew Research Center last week that women in their twenties are out-earning their male colleagues. The pressure is intense: Do it all now so you can have it all later.